Recent and upcoming talks by Jose Iovino

Jose Iovino: Model Theory and the Mean Ergodic Theorem

Place: Fields Institute (Room 210) Date: October 9th , 2015 (13:30-15:00) Speaker: Jose Iovino Title: Model Theory and the Mean Ergodic Theorem Abstract: I will discuss some recent generalizations of Von Neumann’s mean ergodic theory and their connection with standard model-theoretic ideas. continue reading…

Jose Iovino: Definability and Banach space geometry

5/July/2013, 13:30-15:00 Fields Institute, Room 210 Speaker: Jose Iovino Title: Definability and Banach space geometry Abstract: A well known problem in Banach space theory, posed  by Tim Gowers, is whether every Banach space that has an explicitly definable norm must contain one of the classical sequence spaces. continue reading…

Jose Iovino: The Omitting Types Theorem and abstract model theory, part 1

Model Theory Seminar on Monday, February 18, 2013, 5:00 pm   Speaker: Jose Iovino Affiliation: Carnegie Mellon University & UTSA Title: The Omitting Types Theorem and abstract model theory, part 1 Location: Wean 8220 Abstract: It has been said that any fool can realize a type, but it takes a model theorist to omit one. continue reading…

23/Nov/12: Todd Eisworth and Jose Iovino

23/November/2012, 11:o0–12:00 Fields institute,Room 230 Speaker: Todd Eisworth (Ohio University) Title: A proof of Shelah’s “Cov vs. pp” theorem Abstract: We give a relatively easy proof of one of the core results of Shelah’s “Cardinal Arithmetic”. continue reading…

Jose Iovino: Multivalued logics, higher order structures, and the omitting types theorem

Mathematical logic seminar – April 24 2012 Time:     12:00 – 13:20 Room:     Wean Hall 7201 Speaker:         Jose Iovino Department of Mathematics University of Texas at San Antonio Title:     Multivalued logics, higher order structures, and the omitting types theorem Abstract: I will give a survey of how a number of logical frameworks that have evolved, in different contexts and for very different purposes, during the last 50 years, in some cases as multivalued extensions of first-order logic, in others to deal with specific classes of structures, yet in others as general settings for model-theoretic stability, and yet others as theoretical foundations for soft computing, lead to a single model-theoretic logic. continue reading…