Recent and upcoming talks by Andrés Caicedo

Andres Caicedo: Real-valued measurability and the extent of Lebesgue measure

Thursday, November 9, 2017, from 4 to 5:30pm East Hall, room 3096 Speaker: Andres Caicedo (Math Reviews) Title: Real-valued measurability and the extent of Lebesgue measure Abstract: The existence of an atomlessly measurable cardinal is equivalent to the existence of a measure extending Lebesgue measure and defined on all sets of reals. continue reading…

Set Theory, Model Theory and Applications (In memory of Mati Rubin), Eilat, April 22-26, 2018

RESEARCH WORKSHOP OF THE ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Set Theory, Model Theory and Applications (In memory of Mati Rubin)   The international conference “Set Theory, Model Theory and Applications,” in memory of our late colleague Mati Rubin, will take place at the Eilat Campus of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel) from 22 – 26 April, 2018. continue reading…

Andrés Caicedo: Real-valued measurability and Lebesgue measurable sets

University of Notre Dame, Logic Seminar • 125 Hayes-Healy Hall Tue May 2, 2017 2:00PM – 3:00PM Speaker: Andres Caicedo – Mathematical Reviews Title: Real-valued measurability and Lebesgue measurable sets Abstract: I will show that the existence of atomlessly measurable cardinals does not settle the range of Lebesgue measure on the projective sets. continue reading…

Andrés Caicedo: Ramsey theory and small countable ordinals

Albion College, Mathematics Colloquium April 13, 2017, 3:30 PM Location:    Palenske 227 Speaker:    Andrés Eduardo Caicedo (Associate Editor, Mathematical Reviews, Ann Arbor, MI) Title:    Ramsey theory and small countable ordinals Abstract:    I present a brief overview of classical Ramsey theory, and discuss some extensions in the context of small infinite ordinals. continue reading…

Andres Caicedo: MRP and squares, II

Thursday, March 23, 2017, from 4 to 5:30pm East Hall, room 3088 Speaker: Andres Caicedo (Math Reviews) Title: MRP and squares, II Abstract: Justin Moore’s mapping reflection principle (MRP) seems to capture the consistency strength of PFA, since it implies the failure of square. continue reading…

Andres Caicedo: MRP and squares

Thursday, March 16, 2017, from 4 to 5:30pm East Hall, room 2866 Speaker: Andres Caicedo (Math Reviews) Title: MRP and squares Abstract: Justin Moore’s mapping reflection principle (MRP) seems to capture the consistency strength of PFA, since it implies the failure of square. continue reading…

Andres Caicedo: Preserving sequences of stationary subsets of omega_1

Thursday, November 10, 2016, from 4 to 5:30pm East Hall, room 3096 Speaker: Andres Caicedo (Math Reviews) Title: Preserving sequences of stationary subsets of omega_1 Abstract: Let M be an inner model that computes omega_1 correctly. continue reading…

Andrés Caicedo: Topological partition calculus of countable ordinals

Thursday, April 14, 2016; 4:00-5:30 PM, in East Hall 2866. This is joint work with Jacob Hilton. We considered the topological version of the partition calculus in the setting of countable ordinals: Given ordinals $\alpha,\beta_0,\beta_1$, we say that $\alpha\to_{top}(\beta_0,\beta_1)^2$ iff for any 2-coloring of the edges of the complete graph on $\alpha$ vertices, for some color $i$, there is a complete monochromatic graph in color $i$ whose set of vertices is homeomorphic to $\beta_i$. continue reading…

Andrés Caicedo: The Haddad-Sabbagh results in the partition calculus of small countable ordinals, II

Thursday, October 22, 1015 — 16:00 to 17:30 — East Hall 3096 We present the second part of a survey of results announced 45 years ago by Haddad and Sabbagh on the partition calculus of ordinals. continue reading…

Andrés Caicedo: The Haddad-Sabbagh results in the partition calculus of small countable ordinals

Wednesday, October 7, 16:00 to 17:30 in 3096 East Hall We present a survey of results announced 45 years ago by Haddad and Sabbagh on the partition calculus of ordinals. Part of the interest in these results is that they are obtained by reducing genuine infinitary combinatorics problems to purely finite (albeit unfeasible) ones. continue reading…